Tag Archives: “joshua prince”

Firearms Law Seminar – August 19, 2017 at King Shooter Supply!

On August 19, 2017, Chief Counsel Joshua Prince, Attorney Adam Kraut and Attorney Eric Winter of Firearms Industry Consulting Group® (FICG®), a division of Civil Rights Defense Firm, P.C., in conjunction with King Shooters Supply, will offer a four (4) hour seminar, from 1-5pm, on state and federal firearms law at their store located at  346 E Church Rd, King of Prussia, Pennsylvania 19406.

The cost is $10 and you must register early, as last time it sold out fast. You can find out further information on King Shooters Supply’s website.  To register, sign up on the website here. If there are no more spots available, the class will show out of stock. If you have questions, please feel free to contact King Shooters Supply at 610-491-9901.

 


Firearms Industry Consulting Group® (FICG®) is a registered trademark and division of Civil Rights Defense Firm, P.C., with rights and permissions granted to Prince Law Offices, P.C. to use in this article.

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Are you in need of a Maryland firearms lawyer?

If you are in need of a Maryland firearms lawyer, Firearms Industry Consulting Group® (FICG®), a division of Civil Rights Defense Firm, P.C., issued a press release earlier today that Chief Counsel Joshua Prince has been formally admitted by the Court of Appeal of Maryland, so that he can practice firearms law in Maryland, in addition to Pennsylvania.

Please join us in congratulating Joshua on this monumental achievement!

 


Firearms Industry Consulting Group® (FICG®) is a registered trademark and division of Civil Rights Defense Firm, P.C., with rights and permissions granted to Prince Law Offices, P.C. to use in this article.

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Press Release: Chief Counsel Joshua Prince Awarded 2017 NRA Defender of Freedom Award

It is with distinct honor and privilege that we announce that Chief Counsel Joshua Prince has been awarded the 2017 National Rifle Association (NRA) Defender of Freedom Award. Recognizing his “outstanding leadership and distinguished achievement in defense of liberty and the preservation of the Right to Keep and Bear Arms for all law-abiding citizen of the United States of America,” Executive Vice President Wayne LaPierre and Lt. Colonel Oliver North bestowed this great honor on Joshua.

This is the second consecutive year that Joshua has been awarded this honor.

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Please join us in congratulating Joshua in this monumental achievement.

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Filed under ATF, Firearms Law, Maryland Firearms Law, Pennsylvania Firearms Law, Uncategorized

A Very Interesting Decision On City Domestic Violence Convictions Not Triggering A Federal Prohibition

Two days ago, the 10th Circuit Court of Appeals issued a largely overlooked decision in U.S. v. Alexander Pauler, which involved Mr. Pauler’s misdemeanor conviction of domestic violence, pursuant to a municipal ordinance.

Mr. Pauler was previously convicted in 2009 of violating a Wichita, Kansas municipal domestic battery ordinance by punching his girlfriend. As the 10th Circuit declared,

The sole issue before us in this appeal is whether a misdemeanor violation of a municipal ordinance qualifies as a “misdemeanor under . . . State . . . law” when viewed in the context of a statutory scheme that clearly and consistently differentiates between state and local governments and between state statutes and municipal ordinances.

In ruling that Mr. Pauler was not prohibited pursuant to the Gun Control Act, 18 U.S.C. § 921, et seq., and more specifically the Lautenberg amendment, which became 18 U.S.C. § 922(g)(9), the 10th Circuit refreshingly looked to the actual language of the definition of a “misdemeanor crime of domestic violence” found in 18 U.S.C. § 921(a)(33), which provides, in pertinent part that it must bea misdemeanor under Federal, State, or Tribal law.” In this instance, since Mr. Pauler’s conviction was for a municipal crime of domestic violence and not a state crime of domestic violence, the 10th Circuit ruled that he was not prohibited and therefore his conviction for being a prohibited person in possession must be vacated and overturned. 

If you are being charged with being a prohibited person in possession of a firearm, contact Firearms Industry Consulting Group® (FICG®) to discuss your options.

 


Firearms Industry Consulting Group® (FICG®) is a registered trademark and division of Civil Rights Defense Firm, P.C., with rights and permissions granted to Prince Law Offices, P.C. to use in this article.

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Press Release: Attorney Joshua Prince To Be Admitted To Practice In Maryland

We are extremely proud to announce that Joshua Prince, Esq. has received notice from the Maryland State Board of Law Examiners that he passed the Maryland Out-of-State Attorneys’ Bar Exam that was administered in February, 2017. While he must take an orientation program, it is anticipated that he will be licensed to practice in Maryland within the next month.

Joshua looks forward to taking his Firm – the Civil Rights Defense Firm, P.C., including its division, Firearms Industry Consulting Group® (FICG®) – and his dedication to defending our inalienable right to keep and bear arms to Maryland and establishing beneficial precedent in Maryland, as he has done here in Pennsylvania.

Please join us in congratulating him on this monumental achievement.

 


Firearms Industry Consulting Group® (FICG®) is a registered trademark and division of Civil Rights Defense Firm, P.C., with rights and permissions granted to Prince Law Offices, P.C. to use in this article.

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Firearm Preemption Passes Senate With Veto-Proof Vote

Yesterday, the Pennsylvania Senate passed Senate Bill 5 with a vote of 34 to 16, which is a 2/3rds majority veto-proof vote; however, the vote could have been even stronger if three republicans – Senators Greenleaf, Killion and McGarrigle – had not voted against it. 

At the last minute, there were five amendments proposed to Senate Bill 5 of which only one passed. That one provides that the Attorney General shall provide, within 30 days of enactment, notice of the new law to every municipality. Furthermore, the sections of Senate Bill 5 that provide for preemption and enforcement would not be effective for 60 days. What appears lost in relation to this amendment is the fact that firearm preemption has existed since 1979 and it has been a misdemeanor of the 1st degree. Furthermore, there appears to be some thought that unlike us mere peasants, who do not receive personal notification of new laws that are enacted, that municipalities are of a privileged class that deserve personal notification of the fact that their existing ordinances and regulations are in violation of the law.

While Senate Bill 5 is not perfect for other additional issues that I flagged for those capable of resolving them, it is definitely a step in the right direction.

Senate Bill 5 now moves to the House of Representatives for a vote.

There are three things that must be done:

  1. If you are a constituent of Senator Boscola, please contact her and let her know that you appreciate her vote in favor of holding municipalities accountable.
  2. If you are a constituent of Senators Senators Greenleaf, Killion or McGarrigle, please let them know that their vote against holding municipalities accountable will have consequences in their next election.
  3. Please contact your House Representative member and ask them to vote in favor of SB 5.

Together, we can ensure that municipalities stop violating the law and are held accountable.

If your rights have been violated by an illegal firearm ordinance or regulation, contact Firearms Industry Consulting Group, a division of Civil Rights Defense Firm, P.C., to discuss your legal rights.


Firearms Industry Consulting Group® (FICG®) is a registered trademarkand division of Civil Rights Defense Firm, P.C., with rights and permissions granted to Prince Law Offices, P.C. to use in this article.

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Filed under Firearms Law, Pennsylvania Firearms Law

The Problems With Senate Bill 383 Permitting Teachers To Carry Firearms In Pennsylvania

Recently, there has been a lot of public interest and questions asked about Pennsylvania Senate Bill 383, which seeks to provide school districts with the ability to approve school personnel to carry firearms in schools. As many of you are aware, I full support having armed school personnel in our schools; however, this bill suffers from many issues that appear to have never been considered.

First, it requires the school official to have a license to carry firearms (“LTCF”). Why is this of concern? Well, SB 383 fails to consider that LTCF applicant information is confidential and not subject to disclosure; whereby, the disclosure of such information is a felony of the 3rd degree and permits civil penalties. Specifically, 18 Pa.C.S. § 6111(g)(3.1) provides:

Any person, licensed dealer, licensed manufacturer or licensed importer who knowingly and intentionally obtains or furnishes information collected or maintained pursuant to section 6109 for any purpose other than compliance with this chapter or who knowingly or intentionally disseminates, publishes or otherwise makes available such information to any person other than the subject of the information commits a felony of the third degree.

Section 6111(i) then provides, in pertinent part:

Confidentiality.  All information provided by the … applicant, including, but not limited to, the … applicant’s name or identity, furnished by … any applicant for a license to carry a firearm as provided by section 6109 shall be confidential and not subject to public disclosure. In addition to any other sanction or penalty imposed by this chapter, any person, licensed dealer, State or local governmental agency or department that violates this subsection shall be liable in civil damages in the amount of $ 1,000 per occurrence or three times the actual damages incurred as a result of the violation, whichever is greater, as well as reasonable attorney fees.

Second, the bill does nothing to address the confidentiality of this information and how a school district is to protect the disclosure of this information. Who is entitled within the school district to see and have access to this information? Are logs to be kept of who views it and when? Is any training on the confidentiality of LTCF applicant information to be provided to school officials who have access to this information? If so, how frequently? Are logs to be kept of their training? These are all important issues that are not addressed, in any form, by the bill.

I also question why an LTCF is the determining criteria instead of the person being Act 235 certified. It would seem to be far more logical to me to remove the LTCF requirement and replace it with an Act 235 requirement.

Third, and most concerning is the fact that without the confidentiality of this information being addressed in SB 383, one wonders whether such information will be disclosed to the public, including through Right To Know Law (“RTKL”) requests. If so, now an individual intent on harming our children, including a potential terrorist or terrorist group, could learn, in advance, whether a school district has any armed personnel. If so, the criminal/terrorist is likely to target those school personnel first. If, on the other hand, a RTKL request comes back stating that there are no relevant records, such would highlight that there are no armed personnel and that the school is an extremely soft target.

Although I support arming our school personnel, SB 383 fails to address many significant concerns and therefore, I cannot support it in its current form. My hope is that the General Assembly takes action to correct SB 383.

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Filed under Firearms Law, Pennsylvania Firearms Law