Using a Tree Stand on State Game Lands?

Earlier this year the PA Game Commission passed a new regulation relating to tree stands on State Game Lands requiring that owners of the stands now conspicuously mark their stand with their CID number, owner’s first and last name and their home address or a number issued by the Game Commission for this purpose.

tree-stand-safety

The regulation makes it unlawful to:

Construct, place, maintain, occupy, use, leave or abandon any structures or other tangible property, except that portable hunting blinds or stands may be used subject to the following restrictions:

(i) Use may not cause damage to trees.

(ii) Except as provided in subparagraph (iii), overnight placement of portable hunting blinds or stands may not occur sooner than 2 weeks prior to the opening of the first deer season nor later than 2 weeks after the close of the last deer season within each wildlife management unit.

(iii) Overnight placement of portable hunting blinds is additionally permitted during the spring turkey season within each wildlife management unit.

(iv) Portable hunting blinds or stands placed under subparagraph (ii) or (iii) must be conspicuously marked with a durable identification tag that legibly sets forth in the owner’s first name, last name and legal home address in English or must bear a number issued by the Commission for this purpose. 

The Commission did not define what a “durable identification tag” is which may be problematic in the event your tag is somehow damaged or missing. I suggest taking a photo of whatever method you use, so that if it becomes an issue in the future you can prove that it was marked. Some ideas of what may qualify are: engraving a metal tag and attaching it via wire to the stand or using a plastic tag with your information recorded using a paint pen.

If you are interested in obtaining a number issued by the Game Commission for the purpose of marking your stand, you can visit the Game Commission’s Tree Stand Identification Number page.

Good luck out there this season and remember, if you’re approached by the Game Commission you do not lose your Fifth Amendment rights. Never speak to the Game Commission or Law Enforcement without first consulting with an attorney.

 

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Filed under Firearms Law, Hunting

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