U.S. Supreme Court Denies Review of Three Second Amendment As-Applied Challenges

I am extremely disappointed and surprised to announce that this morning, the U.S. Supreme Court denied certiorari in three Second Amendment as-applied challenges. The cases were Holloway v. AG Garland, et al., docket no. 20-782 (regarding whether a single, isolated DUI, involving no property damage or harm to any person can strip someone of their Second Amendment rights); Folajtar v. AG Garland, et al., docket no. 20-812 (regarding whether a young lady’s false statement on a tax return a decade ago, can strip her of her Second Amendment rights); Flick v. AG Garland, et al., docket no. 20-902 (regarding whether an individual who was convicted of smuggling in counterfeit cassette tapes can be stripped of his Second Amendment rights). Both Holloway and Folajtar were cases that I litigated.

Also, while no decision was rendered in NYSRPA, et al. v. Corlett, et al., docket no. 19-156, as it has been distributed and considered at three prior conferences and is scheduled to be considered at the April 19, 2021 conference, it would appear that at least one of the Justices is writing a dissent to the denial of certiorari.

If your constitutional rights have been denied by the U.S. Government, contact Firearms Industry Consulting Group today to discuss YOUR rights and legal options.


Firearms Industry Consulting Group® (FICG®) is a registered trademark and division of Civil Rights Defense Firm, P.C., with rights and permissions granted to Prince Law Offices, P.C. to use in this article.

2 thoughts on “U.S. Supreme Court Denies Review of Three Second Amendment As-Applied Challenges

  1. Hello again Joshua. I have a question about your blog content but thought it better to contact you first by email.

    With all the proposed new 2A regulations, and especially the EO’s, have you considered posting your thoughts on your blog regarding what we can do to support the Constitution and what regulations, in your opinion, may we expect to clear the courts?

    As an example, I have one suppressor in ATF jail and I’m considering buying another one. What {this was a difficult question to compose} path would you recommend we take. For example, continue as you expect that cans won’t be banned, or wait until this goes in front of a judge?

    Thanks for listening and I’ll see you at the East Lancaster County MG shoot.

    John Crociante. 541 Bauer Road, Bath, PA 18014 610-737-2778

    Sent from my iPad

    >

    Like

  2. *The current court is the poorest collection of jurists since Hammurabi.*

    *I often wonder if they have seen a law book, let alone opened it.* *They certainly do deserve or command the respect that comes with the robe.*

    On Mon, Apr 19, 2021 at 12:50 PM Prince Law Offices Blog wrote:

    > Joshua Prince, Esq. posted: ” I am extremely disappointed and surprised to > announce that this morning, the U.S. Supreme Court denied certiorari in > three Second Amendment as-applied challenges. The cases were Holloway v. AG > Garland, et al., docket no. 20-782 (regarding whether a singl” >

    Like

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