Tag Archives: as-applied

Are You Federally Prohibited From Possessing Firearms And Want To Challenge It or Otherwise Restore Your Rights?

If you are federally prohibited, pursuant to criteria in 18 U.S.C. § 922(g), as a result of a non-violent misdemeanor or an involuntary mental health commitment and desire to restore your Second Amendment rights, you may be able to file a Second Amendment as-applied challenge in the federal district court.

While these types of challenges are extremely complex, as you are suing the U.S. Government, we have successfully litigated these types of challenges, including ones involving issues of first impression across the United States. For example, in an issue of first impression, Attorney Joshua Prince was successful in two Second Amendment as-applied challenges involving involuntary mental health commitments in Keyes, et al. v. Sessions, et al. Attorney Prince was also recently successful in having the Western District Court of Pennsylvania hold that a 302 commitment was not sufficient to trigger a prohibition under 18 U.S.C. § 922(g)(4) in Franklin v. Sessions, et al. We also have several challenges pending in relation to prohibitions stemming from DUIs, forgery and making false statement on a federal tax return. Unlike others, we have yet to lose a Second Amendment as-applied challenge that we have brought and the Government is acutely aware of our ability to properly and thoroughly litigate these cases in our clients’ favor.

If you are prohibited from purchasing, possessing and utilizing firearms and ammunition, pursuant to criteria in 18 U.S.C. § 922(g), as a result of a non-violent misdemeanor or mental health commitment, contact Firearms Industry Consulting Group today to discuss YOUR rights and legal options.

 


Firearms Industry Consulting Group® (FICG®) is a registered trademark and division of Civil Rights Defense Firm, P.C., with rights and permissions granted to Prince Law Offices, P.C. to use in this article

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under ATF, Firearms Law

SCOTUS Denies Certiorari in Binderup/Suarez

Today, the U.S. Supreme Court refused to hear the U.S. Government’s request for appeal in the combined cases of Attorney General Sessions v. Binerup and Suarez, leaving in place the District Court and Third Circuit decisions holding that an individual can successfully bring a Second Amendment as-applied challenge to a non-violent misdemeanor firearms disability.

I previously reviewed the Third Circuit’s decision in this blog article.

If you are prohibited as a result of a misdemeanor conviction, contact Firearms Industry Consulting Group, a division of Civil Rights Defense Firm, P.C., to help you restore your Second Amendment Rights.

 


Firearms Industry Consulting Group® (FICG®) is a registered trademark and division of Civil Rights Defense Firm, P.C., with rights and permissions granted to Prince Law Offices, P.C. to use in this article.

Leave a comment

Filed under ATF, Firearms Law, Uncategorized

U.S. Government to Withdraw Appeal in Second Amendment As-Applied Challenge Relating to a Mental Health Commitment

As our viewers are aware, I was previously successful in establishing a right to relief in a Second Amendment as-applied challenge involving a mental health commitment – Monumental Decision from the Middle District of Pennsylvania Regarding Mental Health Commitments and the Second Amendment. Thereafter, the U.S. Government filed an appeal to the Third Circuit Court, where the case is currently pending briefing.

Today, the U.S. Government filed a notice with the Third Circuit that the Acting Solicitor General has elected not to sustain the appeal and the Government will be seeking to withdraw the matter in 30 days, as the Government must provide the U.S. Congress with 30 days notice, for the U.S. Congress to intervene if it sees fit. A copy of the letter sent to Speaker Paul Ryan can be downloaded here.

Accordingly, it appears that in 30 days, the appeal will be withdrawn and the only remaining issue will be the attorney fees and costs to be assessed against the Government.

If you have been denied your inalienable right to Keep and Bear Arms as the result of a mental health commitment or non-violent misdemeanor offense, contact us today to discuss your options. Together, we can vindicate YOUR rights!

2 Comments

Filed under ATF, Firearms Law

Major Pennsylvania Firearm Cases of 2016

As the year is coming to a close, I thought it important to document some of the monumental court decisions that Firearms Industry Consulting Group® (FICG®), a division of Prince Law Offices, P.C., obtained in 2016, as well as, some other cases of importance.

We were successful in a monumental case of first impression in obtaining a decision from the Commonwealth Court holding that all license to carry firearms applicant information is confidential and not subject to disclosure. The court held that disclosure through an un-enveloped postcard was a public disclosure.

The Pennsylvania Supreme Court in Commonwealth v. Childs re-affirmed that the Castle Doctrine is an inalienable/inherent right.

There was the U.S. Supreme Court decision in Birchfield v. North Dakota that held that a state may not imposed additional criminal sanctions or penalties on someone refusing a breathalyzer or blood draw. Although we were not involved in the Birchfield decision, as a result of the decision, we were able to get numerous individual relief from previously prohibiting convictions and plea deals.

In another case of first impression, we were successful in a Second Amendment as-applied challenge in relation to a mental health commitment. The District Court even declared:

Indeed, Mr. Yox provides the perfect test case to challenge § 922(g)(4), as the illogical contradiction of being able to possess firearms in his professional capacities but not being able to possess a firearm for protection in his own home puts in relief a factual scenario where an as-applied Second Amendment challenge to this statute may succeed.

Indeed, if Mr. Yox were not to succeed on his as-applied challenge, we cannot imagine that there exists any person who could.

In a monumental order, the Superior Court vacated its decision in Commonwealth v. Goslin and ordered re-briefing and argument on whether Mr. Goslin, who merely possessed a lawful pocket knife on school grounds, was entitled to the defense of his possession constituting an “other lawful purpose.” This was after the Superior Court had issued a devastating opinion holding that one could only possess a weapon on school grounds if it related to and was necessitated by the reason the individual was on school grounds. We now await the court’s decision.

The most recent decision was in relation to Lower Merion Township’s illegal firearm ordinances, which precluded individuals from possessing and utilizing firearms in their parks, in direct contravention of Article 1, Section 21 of the Pennsylvania Constitution and our state preemption, found in 18 Pa.C.S. 6120. The Commonwealth Court found that Firearm Owners Against Crime (FOAC) was entitled to an injunction.

These are but a few of the extremely important, pro-Second Amendment, decisions that were rendered this year in Pennsylvania.

If your rights have been violated, contact us today to discuss your options! Together, we can ensure that YOUR constitutional rights aren’t infringed!

1 Comment

Filed under Firearms Law, Pennsylvania Firearms Law

6th Circuit Acknowledges Second Amendment As-Applied Challenges To Mental Health Commitments

As our readers are aware, in July, I was successful in arguing in Keyes, et al. v. Lynch, et al., before the Middle District of Pennsylvania that a life long prohibition on an individual as a result of a single, isolated mental health commitment violated his Second Amendment rights, as-applied to him. Today, the 6th Circuit Court of Appeals has issued a decision in Tyler v. Hillsdale County Sheriff’s Dept., et al., acknowledging the same.

The 6th Circuit agreed with an argument that I made in Keyes that the Heller Court’s pronouncement that it was not casting doubt on the ability of the Congress to limit possession of firearms to “the mentally ill” was specific to those who are currently mentally ill, as opposed to those who might, at one time, have a bout of depression or decompression.

As the U.S. Government has now appealed Keyes to the Third Circuit, even after the Binderup/Suarez decision, we expect that the Third Circuit will rule identically to the 6th Circuit and affirm the Middle District’s decision.

If you are prohibited under federal law as a result of a mental health commitment, contact us today to discuss your options. Together, we can fight for your inalienable right to Keep and Bear Arms.

1 Comment

Filed under Constitutional Law, Firearms Law