Tag Archives: “suppressors”

Trump to Alleviate ITAR Obligations for Firearm and Ammunition Manufacturers and Gunsmiths

As our readers are aware, for almost a decade, I have blogged about the obligation of firearm and ammunition manufacturers to register with the Department of State, Directorate of Defense Trade Control (DDTC) under the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), which implement the Arms Export Control Act (AECA), as well as, DDTC’s stepped up enforcement against Federal Firearm Licensees (FFLs) starting in 2012. More recently, the DDTC issued guidance, which placed many gunsmiths out of business because it declared that most gunsmithing activities constituted manufacturing, which in turn required registration at a cost of $2,250, per year, in addition to the compliance costs. After years of requests that firearms and ammunition under Categories I, II and III of the U.S. Munitions List be moved over under the Department of Commerce, today the Department of State has published on its website proposed regulatory changes, which will afford a 45 day comment period, once formally published in the Federal Register. While the proposed changes are monumental, as described below, there are concerns regarding the proposed regulatory changes, which necessitate that those effected obtain competent counsel to timely file comments for DDTC’s consideration. DDTC.jpg

The 42 page proposal provides significant changes in that non-automatic and semi-automatic firearms and ammunition, as well as parts and defense services related thereto, that are currently regulated by Category I, II or III of the U.S. Munitions List will be moved over to the Export Administration Regulations (EAR), which are administered by the Department of Commerce and where there does not exist a registration requirement for the mere manufacture of controlled items, nor is there an annual fee (however, licensing requirements for exports will remain but under EAR). However, fully automatic firearms and ammunition for linked or beltfed firearms will remain under ITAR.

While the proposal is extremely beneficial for many FFLs and it is not surprising that fully automatic firearms are remaining under ITAR, for some unknown reason, silencers, all silencer parts and defense services related thereto, will will remain under ITAR (however, flash suppressors will be moved over under EAR). Additionally, magazine manufacturers that manufacture magazines that have a capacity in excess of 50 rounds must also continue to register under ITAR. This places a monumental burden on small and mid-sized silencer and magazine manufacturers, especially when one considers the compliance requirements and costs, beyond the yearly registration cost of $2,250.

If you or your company wants to file a comment requesting that DDTC consider moving silencers, large capacity magazines, or other items over under EAR, contact Firearms Industry Consulting Group (FICG) to discuss your options, as FICG has a number of attorneys with the necessary experience and understanding of the issues surrounding Administrative Law, the Gun Control Act, the National Firearms Act, and the Arms Export Control Act to ensure that any comment is properly and thorough prepared.

For those interested in some of the comments that FICG has drafted and filed on behalf of Industry Members and itself in opposition to rulemaking by ATF, see:

FICG Files Comment in Opposition to ATF – 41P – ATF’s proposed (and later enacted) rule to impose additional burdens on fictitious entity applications.

FICG Files Comment on behalf of David Goldman, Esq. of GunTrustLawyer.com in Opposition to ATF-41P

FICG Files Comment in Opposition to ATF 51P – ATF’s proposed rule to ATF’s to amend the definitions of “adjudicated as a mental defective” and “committed to a mental institution.”

FICG Files Comment in Opposition to ATF 29P on Behalf of Dead Air Armament – ATF’s advanced notice of proposed rulemaking regarding silencer engravings.

FICG Files Comment in Opposition to ATF’s Proposed Changes to the 4473 Form

 


Firearms Industry Consulting Group® (FICG®) is a registered trademark and division of Civil Rights Defense Firm, P.C., with rights and permissions granted to Prince Law Offices, P.C. to use in this article.

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Filed under ATF, Firearms Law

FICG Files Comment in Opposition to ATF 29P on Behalf of Dead Air Armament

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The Firearms Industry Consulting Group, a division of Prince Law Offices, P.C.,  is pleased to announce that it was retained by Dead Air Armament (“Dead Air”) to prepare a detailed filing in opposition to ATF’s Advanced Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (“ANPR”) 29P.  Dead Air has combined the brains and passion of both Mike Pappas and Gary Hughes to bring to the market some of the most innovative and anticipated silencers of the past year.

Because there is a delay in the posting of newly filed comments on http://www.regulations.gov, a copy is available for your viewing here.

An inspection of the docket this morning showed that no other silencer companies have filed a comment in opposition to this ANPR, making Dead Air the first in the silencer industry to take charge in the fight to prevent additional, unnecessary regulations.

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Filed under ATF, Firearms Law, Uncategorized

Roses are Red, Violets are Blue, You’re a Trustee, So No Background Check For You!

In late March, I wrote an article questioning whether ATF directed FFLs to abuse the NICS system in “requiring” a background check on a trustee to be performed on the transfer of a silencer to a trust. Furthermore, I contended that a Pennsylvania FFL who utilized the PICS system to perform such a check was committing a felony of the third degree under state law.

nics

To my knowledge there is a legal service, who will remain unnamed, that advised Pennsylvania based FFLs to stop transferring silencers to trusts relying on the Dakota Silencer letter that had been published. Relying on the faulty logic that ATF utilized, the legal service concluded that because a trust is not defined as a person under the Gun Control Act of 1968, a trustee must undergo a background check in order to have the silencer transferred from the Pennsylvania FFL to the trustee. I am aware of several Pennsylvania FFLs who have either stopped transferring silencers to trustees or have required that individuals undergo background checks.

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Prior to the writing of the article I had submitted a Right to Know Law Request to the Pennsylvania State Police asking for:

…all records, including but not limited to, any and all communications (either internal or external), determinations, notes, documents, records, etc. regarding gun/firearms trusts and the Uniform Firearms Act 18 Pa.C.S. 6101, et seq. and whether a background check being performed on a trustee purchasing or receiving a transfer on behalf of the trust is necessary.

I received a response today granting my request in part and denying it in part. The denial was merely based on personal identifying information (phone numbers and email addresses which were redacted). You can find the documents here.

The response includes a chain of emails between Christopher Clark of the Pennsylvania State Police and Susan B. Whitman of ATF. Mr. Clark inquires of Mrs. Whitman whether “ATF requires a NICS check on a trustee picking up a silencer on behalf of a trust”.

Mrs. Whitman replies:

No, ATF does not require a PICS/NICS check or a silencer/suppressor or a NFA firearm. PSP requires a PICS check on all firearms including NFA firearms. Silencer/Suppressors do not meet the PA state definition of firearm.

(Emphasis added, misspellings original).

Mr. Clark then asks if it makes a difference if it is being transferred to a trust or corporation and that he received a call from an attorney who indicated to him that ATF told him there has to be a background check when it involves a trust.

Mrs. Whitman responds:

An ATF Form 4473 is required, but the NICS is not required if the firearm/silencer is subject to the provisions of the National Firearms Act (NFA) and has been approved for transfer. The licensee must keep an ATF Form 4473 on file for all NFA transfers.

Under PA State law, all firearm transfers/sales between licensees require a PICS, therefore the ATF Form 4473 for the NFA firearms would include completing the NICS section and conducting a PICS background check.

(Emphasis added).

atf reference

A look at the FAQs in the newest edition of the ATF’s Federal Firearms Regulations Reference Guide (Revised September 2014) has an entry P18: “Are there transfers that are exempt from the NICS background check requirement?” The answer in the guide is rather telling.

Firearm transfers are exempt from the requirement for a NICS background check in three situations. These include transfers: (1) to transferees having a State permit that has been recognized by ATF as an alternative to a NICS check; (2) of National Firearms Act weapons to persons approved by ATF; and (3) certi­fied by ATF as exempt because compli­ance with the NICS background check requirement is impracticable.

[18 U.S.C. 922(t); 27 CFR 478.102(d)]

(Emphasis added). ATF states in its Federal Firearms Regulations Reference Guide, which was updated after the letter sent to Dakota Silencer, that no NICS check is required for a NFA firearm to a person approved by ATF. Since all NFA firearm transfers have to be approved by ATF, there is only one conclusion to draw. No NICS check is required. Period.

Furthermore, the citation to the Brady Bill language in 18 U.S.C. 922 at the bottom of the FAQ references the same provision I cited in my previous article on the subject. The regulation that is referenced states:

(d) Exceptions to NICS check. The provisions of paragraph (a) of this section shall not apply if—…

(2) The firearm is subject to the provisions of the National Firearms Act and has been approved for transfer under 27 CFR part 479…

 

UPDATE:

As there have been some emails and comments on this post, it is appropriate to update it so there is no confusion. In PA and from what I understand, several other states, the definition of a firearm does not include a silencer. However, in PA SBRs, SBSs, Machine Guns and AOWs would require a FFL to conduct a PICS check as the definition of firearm would include those items. I apologize if anyone was misled. This was strictly in the context of a silencer. As always, consult with your legal counsel before making any decisions.

 

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Filed under ATF, Firearms Law, Pennsylvania Firearms Law