Tag Archives: IC3

Online Dating and Relationship Scams

Valentine’s Day is around the corner, but if an online love interest asks you for money, it’s probably a scam.online-dating-scams-3_350

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) receives thousands of reports each year about romance scammers who create fake online relationships only to rob their victims.

Millions of Americans use dating sites, social networking sites and chat rooms to meet people, but scammers use them too, and eventually the scammers ask for money.

The FTC’s new infographic, developed with the American Bankers Association Foundation, lists common signs of online dating scams and how to handle them.

How to Recognize a Scam

The relationship may not be what you think, especially if your sweetheart:

  • wants to leave the dating site immediately and use personal email or IM
  • claims love in a heartbeat
  • claims to be from the U.S., but is traveling or working overseas
  • plans to visit, but is prevented by a traumatic event or a business deal gone sour

Scammers also like to say they’re out of the country for business or military service.

What You Can Do About It

You may lose your heart, but you don’t have to lose your shirt, too. Don’t wire money to cover:

  • travel
  • medical emergencies
  • hotel bills
  • hospital bills for a child or other relative
  • visas or other official documents
  • or losses from a temporary financial setback

Don’t send money to tide someone over after a mugging or robbery, and don’t do anyone a favor by making an online purchase or forwarding a package to another country. One request leads to another, and delays and disappointments will follow. In the end, your money will be gone along with the person you thought you knew.

Report relationship scams to:

If you or your business have legal questions or concerns regarding computer law, privacy, or cybersecurity law matters, contact attorney Jeffrey A. Franklin at Prince Law Offices.

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BEC Attacks to Exceed $9B in 2018

Business email compromise is projected to skyrocket as attackers adopt sophisticated techniques to dupe their victims.

Business email compromise (BEC) attacks are projected to exceed $9 billion in 2018. The attacks continue to become more sophisticated and fleece more money from U.S. businesses.

How it works

There has been an increase of computer intrusions linked to BEC scams, involving fraudsters impersonating high level executives, sending phishing emails from seemingly legitimate sources, and requesting wire transfers to alternate, fraudulent accounts. In some cases these methods ultimately lead to successful intrusion and unfettered access to their victims’ credentials.

The Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3) puts BEC attacks in five categories: Bogus Invoice Schemes, CEO Fraud, Account Compromise, Attorney Impersonation, and Data

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Theft. More information is available from the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) IC3.

Growth Industry

The combination of simplicity and effectiveness have ensured that BEC will continue to be one of the most popular attacks according to a January 18, 2018 Trend Micro report “Delving into the World of Business Email Compromise (BEC).” Researchers analyzed BEC as a cybercriminal operation from January through September 2017, dissecting tools and strategies commonly used in these attacks to predict activity for this year.

The Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3) puts BEC attacks in five categories: Bogus Invoice Schemes, CEO Fraud, Account Compromise, Attorney Impersonation, and Data Theft. In this case, researchers split them in two: Credential-grabbing and Email-only. Attackers must be proficient in at least one of these methods for the scheme to work, researchers report.

Defending against the scam

Businesses are advised to stay vigilant and educate employees on how to prevent being victimized by BEC scams and other similar attacks. It’s important to know that cybercriminals do not care about your company’s size—the more victims, the better. Additionally, cybercriminals need not to be highly technical as they can find tools and services that cater to all levels of technical expertise in the cybercriminal underground. Here are some tips on how to avoid these scams:

• Employee awareness and education is the first step. Organizations should train employees how to spot phishing attacks.

• Email is often used to perform BEC attacks, relying on deception and social engineering to trick employees into downloading files, visiting websites or providing information. End users should know what to look out for when it comes to email—as even the most convincing BEC attacks typically have telltale signs that can be used to distinguish a legitimate email from a malicious one.

• Verify the legitimacy of fund transfer requests, especially those that involve large amounts. Just because the request seemingly comes from an executive, it does not mean that it is legitimate. If possible, confirm the request directly with the person who sent the request if there is something unusual or suspicious about the request.

• For vendors and suppliers, organizations should verify payment requests and invoices before transferring funds. If the vendor or supplier suddenly provides a different payment location, consider it a red flag and verify the change via a secondary sign-off by company personnel.

• Any request should be verified and challenged. If the request comes in via email, making a phone call or face-to-face discussion with the person making the request to ensure its validity will help mitigate BEC attacks. Use known good telephone numbers, not those in the email.

• Building a culture of security within the organization from top to bottom.

What to do

If you suspect that you have been a victim of a BEC email, report the incident to your company and financial institution immediately.  Also, consider filing a complaint with the IC3 no matter how much the amount.

If you or your business have legal questions or concerns regarding computer law, privacy, or cybersecurity law matters, contact attorney Jeffrey A. Franklin at Prince Law Offices.

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