Tag Archives: Wolf

PSP PICS System Stripped of Funding for 2017-2018

At midnight last night, in the absence of Governor Wolf taking any action, HB 218 became law, which, inter alia, stripped the Pennsylvania State Police of the $4,575,000 of additional funding sought by the PSP for the Pennsylvania Instant Check System (PICS) for 2017-2018.

HB-0218-PICS_Budget_Appropriation-17-06-29-ZERO

As you can see, although the PSP putatively did not have any remaining PICS funds from the 2016-2017 budget (unlike every other appropriation), the PSP has $9.8 million in a restricted account, just for use for PICS and which was generated from PICS. So much for PSP’s argument that they lose money in relation to PICS. I also have on good information that $3.3 million of the $9.8 million was just added last year. Requests for more information regarding the receipt of funds to this restricted account have been requested.

While some savvy individuals reviewing HB 218 might point to the $8,757,000 seemingly being appropriated for the “Firearm Records Check Fund,” it is important to explain that such is the removal of that amount from the PSP’s restricted account, reducing it from $9.8 million to approximately $1 million.

It is time for the citizens of Pennsylvania to stop paying millions of dollars, each year, for a broken and duplicative system, when the FBI offer NICS to us for free.

 

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Filed under Firearms Law, Pennsylvania Firearms Law

How will today’s sanctions against Russia impact Firearm’s owners?

In a press conference earlier today, the President announced new sanctions to be imposed against those deemed responsible and also providing support for the current crisis in the Crimea.

The President stated:

Today, I’m announcing a series of measures that will continue to increase the cost on Russia and on those responsible for what is happening in Ukraine.  First, as authorized by the executive order I signed two weeks ago, we are imposing sanctions on specific individuals responsible for undermining the sovereignty, territorial integrity and government of Ukraine.  We’re making it clear that there are consequences for their actions.

Second, I have signed a new executive order that expands the scope of our sanctions.  As an initial step, I’m authorizing sanctions on Russian officials — entities operating in the arms sector in Russia and individuals who provide material support to senior officials of the Russian government.  And if Russia continues to interfere in Ukraine, we stand ready to impose further sanctions.

Now that’s bound to cause a lot of potential confusion and concern. However, let’s first take look at the text of the new Executive Order that might be most germane to firearms owners (and which has been bolded).

Section 1. (a) All property and interests in property that are in the United States, that hereafter come within the United States, or that are or hereafter come within the possession or control of any United States person (including any foreign branch) of the following persons are blocked and may not be transferred, paid, exported, withdrawn, or otherwise dealt in:

(i) the persons listed in the Annex to this order; and

(ii) persons determined by the Secretary of the Treasury, in consultation with the Secretary of State:
(A) to be an official of the Government of the Russian Federation;  (B) to operate in the arms or related materiel sector in the Russian Federation;(C) to be owned or controlled by, or to have acted or purported to act for or on behalf of, directly or indirectly: (1) a senior official of the Government of the Russian Federation; or (2) a person whose property and interests  in property are blocked pursuant to this order; or (D) to have materially assisted, sponsored, or provided financial, material, or technological support for, or goods or services to or in  support of: (1) a senior official of the Government of the Russian Federation; or (2) a person whose property and interests in property are blocked pursuant to this order.

This is then followed with another paragraph that specifically calls back to Section B (the arms section), the text of which reads:

(b) The prohibitions in subsection (a) of this section apply except to the extent provided by statutes, or in
regulations, orders, directives, or licenses that may be issued  pursuant to this order, and notwithstanding any contract entered into or any license or permit granted prior to the effective date of this order.

The text seems to indicate that anything that has already been granted a licence or permit for importation will still be allowed in. At the moment, it’s important to realize that the sanctions against the Russian arms industry are being imposed at the discretion of the Secretary of the Treasury, along with the Secretary of State, so a clear cut guide is not available. Firearms Industry Consulting Group will further analyze these sanctions and their implementation in the coming days and weeks on this blog.

For the moment, we just wanted to give our readers access to the direct text on the matter, so they would not be forced to simply have to read hearsay and uniformed opinions on the issue.

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Filed under ATF, Business Law, Constitutional Law, Firearms Law